Mental Health

Looking after your mental health

Looking after your mental health, your mood and emotional wellbeing is every bit as important as taking care of yourself physically. Keeping your mind active and having strategies to cope during difficult times in your life can help you to feel more positive and can help you to make good decisions for the future.

Mental health conditions are very common and will affect 1 in 4 of us at some point in our lives.

If you're worried about your mental health there's nothing to be ashamed of. It's important to seek help and support just as you would for a physical health condition, whether that means getting in touch with:

  • Your GP
  • Healthy Minds
  • A support group
  • Or trying some self-help strategies

How to get support if you're concerned about your mental health


If you're over the age of 16 years and are registered with a GP in the Heywood, your first stop should be your GP as they'll be familiar with your medical history. Or you could self-refer to the Healthy Minds service.

Mental health and wellbeing

If you're in good mental health you can make the most of your potential, cope with everyday life and play a full part in your family, workplace, community and amongst friends.

Mental health difficulties affect one in four of us at some point in our lives. There are now lots of ways to overcome them, including taking some very practical steps to resolve. Each of us who experience mental health problems can ask services how to access support. They will point you in the right direction and offer guidance as to what are the best appropriate steps to take. It sometimes helps to think of mental health and mental illness as two separate concepts. This is explained below.

Good mental health means that we feel happy about ourselves. We have a sense of purpose, a belonging to a community and a purpose in life. We have good self-esteem/feel valued and in control of our lives.

Mental illness is much more clinical, defined by symptoms and diagnosed by doctors. Although treatments for mental illness are often medication based and rely on professionals to diagnose and prescribe the right treatments, it is important to recognise that each and every one of us can take steps ourselves to improve our mental health irrespective of whether or not we have a mental illness. In taking such steps it is often the case that the treatment can be provided at the right time meaning symptoms of illness become less distressing and more easily managed.

Research has shown that remaining hopeful and positive about the future and developing the inner strength to be in control of your illness helps to combat the symptoms of mental distress which can at times feel overwhelming.

If you're in good mental health you can make the most of your potential, cope with everyday life and play a full part in your family, workplace, community and among friends.